Thursday, 16 September 2010

Apricot and wheatgerm loaf


I've made this a few times before, but not recently. I'd forgotten quite how good it is toasted for breakfast with lashings of butter - the apricots soften and become chewy, and there's a nicely contrasting crisp crust covered with sesame seeds. It's very simple to make too, though with a slightly unusual step that involves pouring hot water over some dates, blitzing them in a blender and mixing with yoghurt, and using this as the liquid in the bread dough. Apparently there was a study in Jordan which showed that adding mashed dates to a loaf makes it rise more and last longer, according to Dan Lepard. It seems to work, but I can't really say I've had an opportunity to test the longevity of this bread, because I normally consume the entire thing in about two days. Recipe is here.



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6 comments:

  1. Oh my goodness, that looks delightful! Do you have a recipe?

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  2. Well, hello, if I'd paid attention, I would have seen that you linked to it. Duh.

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  3. Thank you for sharing this great recipe and introducing me to Mr Lepard's genius 10 second / 10 minute kneading technique. I think I need some practice as it didn't rise as much as I think it needed to, and was quite doughy, despite extra cooking time. May have been a kneading problem, a little too much yogurt or not quite enough yeast so I will try to correct it next time. BUT the flavour is great, as is the crunchy crust and we still managed to eat the whole thing - great warm from the oven; great cool; great toasted over the next few days or from the freezer. Other readers - try it!

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  4. PS how long does it take for your dough in this recipe to double in size, Elly, and is this in a warm place or just left on the kitchen work top? Thank you.

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  5. Hmmm to be honest it really depends on how warm your kitchen is. Generally around 2 hours is enough, though if it's really warm it will take less time. Some ovens have a special proving setting, or you can switch your oven to around 25-30C to help it along, and just put the dough in there. If you just leave it on the worktop it might take a bit longer. I also find that using fresh yeast helps dough rise, though it's not the easiest thing to get hold of. Hope that helps!

    Also, it is quite a 'doughy' bread. I think that's due to the apricots - using dried fruit in loaves makes the crumb a lot more moist. So if it's still a bit doughy next time don't worry - when toasted you don't really notice!

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  6. Thanks for your tips. I agree it is inevitably quite a doughy bread and that you don't notice when toasted. In fact I loved the texture, even untoasted, which is down to the fruit, as you say. But there was definitely room for some improvement in mine, especially if I am to share it with others. Need to match up to you photo next time! I will make it again soon. Thank you Elly.

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